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How Is Your Skin Doing?…

The following information is for educational purposes only, it is not to be construed as any form of medical advice. If you have one of these skin conditions, please consult with your physician.

Did you know?…[From an article on WebMD]: “Your skin is the largest organ on your body, made up of several different components, including water, protein, lipids, and different minerals and chemicals. It’s job is crucial: to protect you from infections and germs.

Throughout your life, your skin will change constantly, for better or worse. In fact, your skin will regenerate itself approximately every 27 days. Proper skin care is essential to maintaining the health and vitality of this protective organ.”

[From Medline Plus]: “As you age, you are at increased risk for skin injury. Your skin is thinner, more fragile, and the protective subcutaneous fat layer is lost…Aging skin repairs itself more slowly than younger skin. Wound healing may be up to 4 times slower.”

Here is some information about a variety of skin issues.

Abrasion

Abrasion injuries most commonly occur when exposed skin comes into moving contact with a rough surface, causing a grinding or rubbing away of the upper layers of the epidermis.

Acne

Acne vulgaris (or simply acne) is a long-term skin disease that occurs when hair follicles become clogged with dead skin cells and oil from the skin. Acne is characterized by areas of blackheads, whiteheads, pimples, and greasy skin, and may result in scarring.

Allergic Rashes

Rashes can be caused by many things, including plants (poison ivy, for example), allergic reactions to a medication or a food, or an illness (measles or chickenpox, for example). Eczema and hives, both of which are related to allergies, are two of the most common skin rashes.

Arthritis

Arthritis is a form of joint disorder that involves inflammation in one or more joints. The most common form of arthritis is osteoarthritis (degenerative joint disease), a result of trauma to the joint, infection of the joint, or age.

Ashy Skin

Xeroderma or Ashy Skin is a condition involving the integumentary system, which in most cases can safely be treated with emollients or moisturizers.

Athlete’s Foot

Athlete’s foot, known medically as tinea pedis, is a common skin infection of the feet caused by fungus. Signs and symptoms often includes itching, scaling, and redness.

Bed Sores

Bed sores are localized injuries to the skin and/or underlying tissue as a result, or pressure in combination with shear and/or friction.

Bee Stings

Bee stings differ from insect bites, and the venom or toxin of stinging insects is quite different. Therefore, the body’s reaction to a bee sting may differ significantly from one species to another.

Blisters

A blister is a small pocket of fluid within the upper layers of the skin, typically caused by forceful rubbing (friction), burning, freezing, chemical exposure or infection.

Boils

A boil, also called a furuncle, is a deep folliculitis, infection of the hair follicle. It is most commonly caused by infection by the bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, resulting in a painful swollen area on the skin caused by an accumulation of pus and dead tissue. Boils which are expanded are basically pus-filled nodules. Individual boils clustered together are called carbuncles.

Bruises

A bruise, also called a contusion or an ecchymosis, is a visible bluish or purplish mark or patch appearing beneath the surface of the skin, resulting from blood that leaked out of the deeper layers of the tissues. Bruises are usually caused by a blow or pressure. In older people, bruises may also occur without a special reason.

Burns

A burn is a type of injury to skin , or other tissues, caused by heat, electricity, chemicals, friction, or radiation. The treatment required depends on the severity of the burn.

Bursitis

Bursitis is the inflammation of one or more bursae (small sacs) of synovial fluid in the body. Healthy bursae create a smooth, almost frictionless functional gliding surface making normal movement painless. When bursitis occurs, however, movement relying on the inflamed bursa becomes difficult and painful.

Candida

Candida is a genus of yeasts and is the most common cause of fungal infections worldwide. Many species are harmless commensals or endosymbionts of hosts including humans; however, when mucosal barriers are disrupted or the immune system is compromised they can invade and cause disease.

Canker Sores

A mouth ulcer (also termed an oral ulcer, or a mucosal ulcer) is an ulcer that occurs on the mucous membrane of the oral cavity. Mouth ulcers are very common, occurring in association with many diseases and by many different mechanisms, but usually there is no serious underlying cause.

Chapped Lips

Chapped lips (also cheilitis simplex or common cheilitis) are characterized by cracking, fissuring, and peeling of the skin of the lips, and are one of the most common types of cheilitis. While both lips may be affected, the lower lip is the most common site.

Chapped Skin

Occuring from dry skin, a skin fissure is a cutaneous condition in which there is a linear-like cleavage of skin, sometimes defined as extending into the dermis. It is smaller than a skin laceration.

Chemical Burns

A chemical burn occurs when your skin or eyes come into contact with an irritant, such as an acid or a base. Bases are described as alkaline. Chemical burns are also known as caustic burns. They may cause a reaction on your skin or within your body. These burns can affect your internal organs if chemicals are swallowed.

Cold Sores

A cold sore is a fluid-filled, painful blister that is usually on or around the lips. Other names for a cold sore are fever blister, oral herpes, labial herpes, herpes labialis, and herpes febrilis. Cold sores most often occur on the lips which distinguishes them from the common canker sore which is usually inside the mouth. Cold sores do not usually occur inside the mouth except during the initial episode. Canker sores usually form either on the tongue or inside the cheeks.

Cradle Cap

Cradle cap, also known as infantile or neonatal seborrhoeic dermatitis, crusta lactea, milk crust, honeycomb disease, is a yellowish, patchy, greasy, scaly and crusty skin rash that occurs on the scalp of recently born babies. It is usually not itchy and does not bother the baby.

Dermabrasion

Abrasion injuries most commonly occur when exposed skin comes into moving contact with a rough surface, causing a grinding or rubbing away of the upper layers of the epidermis.

Diaper Rash

Diaper rash, or diaper dermatitis, is a general term describing any of a number of inflammatory skin conditions that can occur in the diaper area.

Eczema

Atopic dermatitis (eczema) is a condition that makes your skin red and itchy. It’s common in children but can occur at any age. Atopic dermatitis is long lasting (chronic) and tends to flare periodically and then subside. It may be accompanied by asthma or hay fever.

Edema

Edema is an observable swelling from fluid accumulation in body tissues. Edema most commonly occurs in the feet, ankles and legs, where it is referred to as peripheral edema. Edema of the foot is sometimes called pedal edema. The swelling is the result of the accumulation of excess fluid under the skin in the spaces within the tissues.

Fever Blisters

A small sore situated on the face or in the mouth that causes pain, burning, or itching before bursting and crusting over. The favorite locations are on the lips, chin or cheeks and in the nostrils. Less frequented sites are the gums or roof of the mouth (the palate).

Flea Bites

Flea bites exhibit several common symptoms. They are very itchy, and the skin around each bite may become sore or painful. You may experience hives or develop a rash near the site of a bite. Additionally, excessive itching can lead to an infection.

Folliculitis

Folliculitis is a common skin condition in which hair follicles become inflamed. It’s usually caused by a bacterial or fungal infection. At first it may look like small red bumps or white-headed pimples around hair follicles — the tiny pockets from which each hair grows. The infection can spread and turn into nonhealing, crusty sores.

Fungus

Fungi usually make their homes in moist areas of the body where skin surfaces meet: between the toes, in the genital area, and under the breasts. Common fungal skin infections are caused by yeasts.

Hives

Hives, also called urticaria,  a hypersensitive skin reaction characterized by the sudden appearance of very itchy, slightly raised, smooth, flat-topped wheals and plaques that are usually redder or paler than the surrounding skin. In the acute form, the skin lesions generally subside in 6 to 24 hours, but they may come and go and persist much longer in the chronic form.

Impetigo

Impetigo is a highly contagious skin infection that mainly affects infants and children. Impetigo usually appears as red sores on the face, especially around a child’s nose and mouth. The sores burst and develop honey-colored crusts.

Inflamed Joints

Swollen joints refers to the enlargement of the joints, usually as a result of an inflammatory process or injury to the joint or to surrounding structures. Joint swelling may be accompanied by other symptoms, including stiffness, pain, redness, warmth, and apparent loss of range of motion of the joint.

Insect Bites

Most bites cause mild stinging or itching. Some bites can trigger a life-threatening allergic reaction that requires emergency care. Breathing difficulty, facial swelling, dizziness, confusion, and hives are symptoms of such a reaction.

Itching

Pruritus simply means itching. It can be associated with a number of disorders, including dry skin, skin disease, pregnancy, and more.

Jock Itch

Jock itch (tinea cruris) is a fungal infection that affects the skin of your genitals, inner thighs and buttocks. Jock itch causes an itchy, red, often ring-shaped rash in these warm, moist areas of your body.

Keratosis

An actinic keratosis, also known as a solar keratosis, is a scaly or crusty growth (lesion). It most often appears on the bald scalp, face, ears, lips, backs of the hands and forearms, shoulders, neck or any other areas of the body frequently exposed to the sun. You’ll often see the plural, “keratoses,” because there is seldom just one.

Lupus

Lupus, an autoimmune disease, happens when the immune system attacks its tissues, causing inflammation, swelling, pain, and damage. Lupus symptoms include fatigue, joint pain, fever, and a lupus rash.

Poison Ivy

Poison ivy rash is caused by an allergic reaction to an oily resin called urushiol. This oil is in the leaves, stems and roots of poison ivy, poison oak and poison sumac.

Poor Circulation

Your body’s circulation system is responsible for sending blood, oxygen, and nutrients throughout your body. When blood flow to a specific part of your body is reduced, you may experience the symptoms of poor circulation. Poor circulation is most common in your extremities, such as your legs and arms; and can lead to itching.

Psoriasis

Psoriasis is a common skin condition that changes the life cycle of skin cells. Psoriasis causes cells to build up rapidly on the surface of the skin. The extra skin cells form thick, silvery scales and itchy, dry, red patches that are sometimes painful.

Razor Burns

Razor bumps, or ingrown hairs, are small, irritated bumps on the skin. They happen after you shave, when strands of hair curl back on themselves and grow into the skin. They cause irritation and pimples. They also may cause scarring.

Ring Worm

Ringworm of the body is a fungal infection that develops on the top layer of your skin. It’s characterized by a red circular rash with clearer skin in the middle. It may or may not itch. Ringworm gets its name because of its appearance. There is no actual worm involved.

Rosacea

Rosacea most commonly affects middle-aged women with fair skin. It can be mistaken for acne or other skin conditions. Key symptoms are facial redness with swollen red bumps and small visible blood vessels.

Rough Hands

Many factors can cause dry, rough hands, such as dry air, cold weather, low humidity, sun exposure, excessive hand washing or immersion in water, exposure to harmful chemicals, swimming in chlorinated pools and use of soap bars.

Scabies

Scabies produces a skin rash composed of small red bumps and blisters and affects specific areas of the body.

Sebaceous Cyst

Causes of a Sebaceous Cyst. Sebaceous cysts form out of your sebaceous gland which produces the oil called sebum that coats your hair and skin. Cysts can develop if the gland or its duct, the passage where oil is able to leave, become damaged or blocked. This usually occurs due to a trauma to the area.

Seborrhea

Abrasion injuries most commonly occur when exposed skin comes into moving contact with a rough surface, causing a grinding or rubbing away of the upper layers of the epidermis.

Shingles

Shingles is a viral infection that causes a painful rash. Although shingles can occur anywhere on your body, it most often appears as a single stripe of blisters that wraps around either the left or the right side of your torso.

Sore Muscles

Almost everyone has sore, aching muscles now and then. Muscle pain (myalgia) can range from mild to excruciating. Though it often goes away in a few days, sometimes muscle pain can linger for months. Muscle pain can develop almost anywhere in your body, including your neck, back, legs and even your hands.

Stretch Marks

Streaks or stripes on the skin, especially on the abdomen, caused by distension of the skin from obesity or during pregnancy.

Styes

A sty is a red, painful lump near the edge of your eyelid that may look like a boil or a pimple. Sties are often filled with pus. A sty usually forms on the outside of your eyelid. But sometimes it can form on the inner part of your eyelid.

Sunburn

Sunburn red, painful skin that feels hot to the touch usually appears within a few hours after too much exposure to ultraviolet (UV) light from sunshine or artificial sources, such as sunlamps. Sunburn may take several days or longer to fade.

Varicose Veins

Varicose veins are gnarled, enlarged veins. Any vein may become varicose, but the veins most commonly affected are those in your legs and feet. That’s because standing and walking upright increases the pressure in the veins of your lower body.

Very Dry Skin

Abnormally dry skin. Can be caused by a dry climate, winter weather, severe deficiency of vitamin A, systemic illness, overexposure to sunlight, or medication.

Warts

Common warts are small, grainy skin growths that occur most often on your fingers or hands. Rough to the touch, common warts also often feature a pattern of tiny black dots sometimes called seeds which are small, clotted blood vessels.

Wind Burn

Windburn is a condition whereby a sunburn obtained in cool or cloudy conditions is incorrectly attributed to the effects of the wind rather than the sun.

Website Disclaimer: The following list of skin conditions and any skin conditions addressed or described on the individual pages of this website are intended for general descriptive and informational purposes only. Corium 21 makes no medical claims. As with any condition of the body, one should always consult a licensed medical practitioner before undergoing any course of treatment and act in accordance with advice of one’s own Physician.

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