d
Blog Disclaimer:The following information is for educational purposes only, it is not to be construed as any form of medical advice. Consult your physician if you have any questions.

Lupus

What is Lupus?

Lupus Disease Lupus is an autoimmune disease where the body’s immune system becomes hyperactive and attacks normal, healthy tissue.

This results in symptoms such as inflammation, swelling, and damage to joints, skin, kidneys, blood, the heart, and lungs.

Under normal function, the immune system makes proteins called antibodies in order to protect and fight against antigens such as viruses and bacteria.

Lupus makes the immune system unable to differentiate between antigens and healthy tissue.

This leads the immune system to direct antibodies against the healthy tissue – not just antigens – causing swelling, pain, and tissue damage.

What are the different types of Lupus?

Several different kinds of lupus have been identified, but the type that we refer to simply as lupus is known as systemic lupus erythematosus or SLE. Other types include discoid (cutaneous), drug-induced, and neonatal.

Patients with discoid lupus have a version of the disease that is limited to the skin. It is characterized by a rash that appears on the face, neck, and scalp, and it reportedly does not normally affect internal organs. However, there is no way to predict or prevent the path of the disease. If you feel you have Lupus symptoms, contact your local physician.

SLE is more severe than discoid lupus because it can affect any of the body’s organs or organ systems. Some people may experience inflammation or other problems with only skin and joints, while other SLE sufferers may have joints, lungs, kidneys, blood, and/or the heart affected.

This type of lupus is also often characterized by periods of flare (when the disease is active) and periods of remission (when the disease is dormant).

Drug-induced lupus is caused by a reaction to certain prescription drugs and causes symptoms very similar to SLE. The drugs most commonly associated with this form of lupus are a hypertension medication called hydralazine and a heart arrhythmia medication called procainamide, but there are some 400 other drugs that can also cause the condition. Drug-induced lupus is known to subside after the patient stops taking the triggering medication.

A rare condition, neonatal lupus occurs when a mother passes autoantibodies to a fetus. The unborn and newborn child can have skin rashes and other complications with the heart and blood. Usually, a rash appears but eventually fades within the first six months of the child’s life.

Common Medications

If you have Lupus, your doctor may want to discuss these medications any possible side effects with you.

Three types of drugs are commonly used to treat lupus when signs and symptoms are mild or moderate. More aggressive lupus may require more aggressive drugs. In general, when first diagnosed with lupus, your doctor may discuss these medications:

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. Aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as naproxen sodium (Aleve) and ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin, others), have been used to treat a variety of signs and symptoms associated with lupus. NSAIDs are available over-the-counter, or stronger versions can be prescribed by your doctor.

Check with your doctor before taking over-the-counter NSAIDs because some have been associated with serious side effects in people with lupus. Side effects of NSAIDs include stomach bleeding, kidney problems and an increased risk of heart problems.

Antimalarial drugs. Although there’s no known relationship between lupus and malaria, these medications have proved useful in treating signs and symptoms of lupus. Antimalarials may also prevent flares of the disease. Hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil) is the most commonly prescribed antimalarial. Side effects of antimalarial drugs include vision problems and muscle weakness.

Corticosteroids. These drugs counter the inflammation of lupus but can have serious long-term side effects, including weight gain, easy bruising, thinning bones (osteoporosis), high blood pressure, diabetes and increased risk of infection.

“I was diagnosed with Lupus 4 years ago. Along with that I also have Raynaud’s syndrome. My hands are very dry and swell up and they also get very cold and turn white. I’ve been using your skin cream for about a year and have found a tremendous difference in my hands. I really love the product and won’t use anything else.”
-D.W.

See some more of our customer testimonials.

If you think you have lupus, consult with a medical doctor before embarking on any type of handling for this condition.

Read more about:

Bursitis
Fibromyalgia
Poor Circulation

CALL US – U.S.: 1-800-319-5114 / Intl: 1-818-563-2866 or Click here